The weekend is ruining my diet

Good morning.

Question: I have good weeks of eating, but really struggle on the weekend. What can I do to maintain a healthy diet across the weekend, without missing out on social events and food and drinks.

This is very common - disciplined throughout the week and then losing it on the weekend.

What’s frustrating about this structure is that you are disciplined more days than not (5 vs 2) but still going nowhere. It becomes easy to think you’re putting in a lot of work (which you are) for no results.

There is certainly something you can do.

Prioritise.

You have to pick what it’s important, and then eliminate what’s not. Sometimes you even have to modify what is important.

If it’s something like a brunch catch up with friends, that’s actually pretty simple. 

You can still go, just order a lower-energy option - eggs with salmon instead of bacon, minimal bread and sauce. 

This means you are prioritising the social interaction over ordering what everyone else is eating, but you still get go. 

There might be some food-jealousy, but which is more important - the higher-energy food or the interaction?

If you can’t do that, maybe the food - not the friends - is the main reason you are catching up with them.

The same goes for alcohol.

It’s important to note that I am not talking about one-off events. Of course, there are times when you can deviate from the strategy and have fun.

But if it’s happening all the time, then there’s a need for priorities. When dieting, you can sometimes have your cake and eat it too, but not every week.

If the food and drinks keep winning out, then you need to ask yourself is the diet a priority - because it obviously isn’t.

This is why screening for motivations and understanding your true goals is important, because they need to take priority over other aspects of your life for a while.

Because 5/7 days of good eating doesn't get you 5/7 of the weight loss result you want, it gets you none.

Wow, I actually just has an insight!

Ellie has noticed that I am very proficient at doing 80% of pretty much any domestic duty. She would prefer me to do 100% of that duty, also known as finishing it.

I don’t deliberately do 80%, I just want to get it done ASAP and end up missing things, essentially not completing the job.

It’s frustrating for me, because instead of getting praise I think I am entitled to, I get constructive feedback about maybe completing the task.

It’s also frustrating for Ellie, because the task is not done and even the fact that constructive feedback is required seems ridiculous.

That sounds familiar...

Tom Fitzgerald